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Sir William Wallace

Sir William Wallace, 3 April 1270 - 23 August 1305, was a Scottish knight who became one of the main leaders during the First War of Scottish Independence. Along with Andrew Moray, Wallace defeated an English army at the Battle of Stirling Bridge in September 1297

The original construction, now the remains, of the "Wallace Tower" on the Rock; was probably named in honour of the great patriot, although it dates from a later period. Opinions differ on whether Wallace himself was ever held at the Castle; on the one hand, the 1958 version of the Castle's official guide-book states that "it is improbable that Wallace was detained in the castle"; on the other, MacPhail states that "although there is no record of Wallace's confinement in the castle after his capture, this was most likely to have happened as Sir John Menteith, who was sheriff of Dumbarton and keeper of the castle, was responsible for having him transported to London; but it could only have been for a day or so, as Wallace was brought to trial in Westminster Hall a little over three weeks from the date of his capture" [MacPhail, p15-16].

Sir William Wallace was a Scottish knight who became one of the main leaders during the First War of Scottish Independence. Along with Andrew Moray, Wallace defeated an English army at the Battle of Stirling Bridge in September 1297.

The Wallace Sword was kept at Dumbarton Castle until 1888, but was transferred in that year to the National Wallace Monument.